Nikola Tesla's Teleforce and Telegeodynamics Proposals

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Average: 5 (1 vote)
This book contains the original texts of two unique proposals that Nikola Tesla offered up during his later years. In both cases, the technologies described trace their roots back to an earlier and tremendously productive decade in Tesla's life beginning in the early 1890s. At the time of the proposals' unveiling, “teleforce,” the particle beam concept, and “telegeodynamics,” the mechanical earth-resonance concept, received significant press coverage. The teleforce death-beam weapon was first divulged on Tesla's 78th birthday, July 10, 1934 in the New York Sun . With this machine, he claimed... continue reading »

Nikola Tesla on His Work With Alternating Currents

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Average: 5 (5 votes)
The surfacing of the transcript for this pre-hearing interview with Nikola Tesla by his legal counsel in 1916 resulted from an intensive search in archives of legal firms, some now defunct and others later acquired by contemporary interests. The interview was precipitated by numerous pending court cases as the fledgling radio industry entered a period of fierce competition. Tesla's counsel believed the interview necessary not only in order to prepare for the pressing of his own claims against the Marconi Company, but also to protect his own patent interests when called to give expert-witness... continue reading »

Nikola Tesla: Lecture Before the New York Academy of Sciences April 6, 1897: The Streams of Lenard and Roentgen and Novel Apparatus for Their Production

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Average: 4.7 (3 votes)
Anderson's reconstruction of Tesla's lecture before the New York Academy of Sciences on April 6, 1897, is a most important contribution. In this lecture, Tesla went beyond his titled topic, “The Streams of Lenard and Roentgen and Novel Apparatus for Their Production,” and expanded on his X-ray articles published in the New York Electrical Review . Some 120 large drawings of his vacuum tubes were displayed on the walls of the lecture hall. Among the tubes represented were not only Crookes and Lenard types but varieties of single-electrode tubes of Tesla's own invention, some of which were used... continue reading »

Dr. Nikola Tesla Bibliography (1856-1943)

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Average: 4.5 (2 votes)
To the inquiring student, the early writings of Nikola Tesla still retain their stimulating quality of presenting new avenues of investigation yet to be explored. Tesla was an indefatigable research scientist who, as the true explorer, found the laboratory a more adventurous surrounding than the office. It is not too surprising then that the complete disclosure in scientific papers and discourse in technical journals was frequently dismissed - such omissions having been a great source of annoyance to the historical and research student. The very nature and effect of this state of affairs was... continue reading »

Nikola Tesla's Residences, Laboratories, and Offices

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This compilation of Nikola Tesla's residences, laboratories, and offices in America was accomplished by examining collections in the following public/institutional libraries and private collections: Tesla manuscript collection (including the seven reels of microfilmed correspondence received in 1961 from the Nikola Tesla Museum) and the John Hays Hammons, Jr., collection, Library of Congress; manuscript holdings of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library (Butler Library), and the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University in the City of New York; manuscript holdings in the... continue reading »

Dr. Nikola Tesla Bibliography

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Average: 5 (1 vote)
First published in 1979, this is the second printing of an exhaustive annotated bibliography of writings by and about the inventor Nikola Tesla (1856-1943). The period covered is from 1884 through 1978 with approximately 3,000 citations arranged in chronological order. In compiling this edition, all earlier bibliographical efforts were merged, with both North American and European sources being cited. In addition to searching periodical directories and newspaper indexes, complete runs of 23 serials were examined for content; morgue files were examined for unindexed newspapers; Tesla's estate... continue reading »

Nikola Tesla: Guided Weapons and Computer Technology

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Average: 5 (1 vote)
Nikola Tesla was born of Serbian parents at Smiljan, in the Austro-Hungarian border province of Lika, now part of Croatia, at midnight July 9-10, 1856. His father, Milutin, was a Serbian Orthodox priest, and his mother, née Djouka Mandić, was of a family line whose sons were clergy and whose daughters were wives of clergy. The Serbian Orthodox church then use the Julian calendar, and it continues to use this calendar today for days of observance. The American colonies had converted to the Gregorian calendar 132 years before Tesla arrived at New York in 1884. When Tesla crossed this ‘date line... continue reading »