Interplanetary Communication

Average: 5 (1 vote)
September 24th, 1921
Type: 
Page numbers: 
620
To the Editors of the Electrical World: There are countless worlds such as ours in the universe — planets revolving around their suns in elliptical orbits and spinning on their axes like gigantic tops. They are composed of the same elements and subject to the same forces as the earth. Inevitably at some period in their evolution light, heat and moisture are bound to be present, when inorganic matter will begin to run into organic forms. The first impulse is probably given by heliotropism; then other influences assert themselves, and in the course of ages, through continuous adjustment to the... continue reading »

Nikola Tesla Becomes the Recipient of Edison Medal

Average: 1 (1 vote)
May 19th, 1917
Type: 
PRESENTATION OF AWARD FOR EARLY ORIGINAL WORK AND TRIBUTES TO THE INVENTOR — NEW A. I. E. E. OFFICERS Presentation of the Edison medal to Nikola Tesla and formal report upon the newly elected officers were the announced features of the annual meeting of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers in New York on the evening of May 18. Nikola Tesla As stated previously in the Electrical World , the Edison medal is presented to Mr. Tesla for “early original work in polyphase and high-frequency electric currents.” Dr. A. E. Kennelly as chairman of the Edison medal committee outlined the origin... continue reading »

Nikola Tesla

Average: 5 (1 vote)
May 19th, 1917
Type: 
Page numbers: 
1 & 2
The award of the Edison medal to Nikola Tesla is most appropriate, in view of the early contribution that he made to alternating-current motors. In order to recognize that contribution, one must go back to the period, thirty years ago, when alternating-current engineering was greatly handicapped by the absence of motors capable of being installed on alternating-current circuits. Direct-current motors were well advanced, and there were many of them, particularly in America; but, except for synchronous single-phase motors and a few small series motors, the alternating-current motor was unknown... continue reading »

Nikola Tesla is Awarded the Edison Medal by A.I.E.E.

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May 5th, 1917
Type: 
Page numbers: 
857
“Meritorious Achievements in His Early Original Work in Polyphase and High-Frequency Currents” to Be Honored on May 18 The seventh Edison medal, which was awarded to Nikola Tesla on Dec. 13, 1916, “for meritorious achievements in his early original work in polyphase and high-frequency electric currents.” will be presented to Mr. Tesla at the annual meeting of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers in the auditorium of the Engineering Societies Building, 29 West Thirty-ninth Street, New York, on Friday evening, May 18, 1917, at 8.30 p. m. Ladies are invited to attend this meeting... continue reading »

From Nikola Tesla (A Tribute to George Westinghouse)

Average: 4 (3 votes)
March 21st, 1914
Type: 
The first impressions are those to which we cling most in later life. I like to think of George Westinghouse as he appeared to me in 1888, when I saw him for the first time. The tremendous potential energy of the man had only in part taken kinetic form, but even to a superficial observer the latent force was manifest. A powerful frame, well proportioned, with every joint in working order, an eye as clear as a crystal, a quick and springy step — he presented a rare example of health and strength. Like a lion in a forest, he breathed deep and with delight the smoky air of his factories. Though... continue reading »